Monthly Archives: April 2014

10 Proven Health Benefits of Low-Carb and Ketogenic Diets

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Many studies show that low-carb and ketogenic diets can lead to dramatic weight loss and improve most major risk factors for heart disease and diabetes.

Asher Laub‘s insight:

Research ahows that high cholesterol is surprisingly not a result of fats but rather carbohydrates thay activate a cholesterol enzyme.  We’ve been on high fat diets for a few million years and on high carbs for a few thousand.  Our genes haven’t adapted away from fats.  High protein untake is not ketogenic high fat is.

See on authoritynutrition.com

Low Carb Dieting Myths

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The myths about low carb dieting are traded freely among those who just don’t know any better. I’ve tried to shine some light on these falsehoods here.

Asher Laub‘s insight:

Ketogenesis (or low carb) explained pretty clearly in layman’s terms. Important to remind people that ketogenic diets are high in vegetables/fruits and fats, not protein and carbs. Protein and carb intake are usually moderate depending on a person’s total caloric intake. The quality of fats and proteins (grass fed/organic) is critical to a successful ketogenic diet. The benefits are quite extraordinary if carbs are not working for yoy. It’s sort of like a 2nd chance. 

See on www.ketogenic-diet-resource.com

Gluconeogenesis

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Gluconeogenesis means “make new sugar”. Find out why it’s important during a low carb diet.

Asher Laub‘s insight:

Article synopsis on improving/eliminating metabolic syndrome by switching to a ketogenic diet (breaking down fats).  This also debunks the myth that complex carbohydrates are a "low metabolic stressor" for the body and thus a better option than fat for improved corticosteroid metabolism. Adrenal/thyroid function may, in fact, be much better off on the ketogenic "engine" as opposed to the carbohydrate engine.  Vegetables and fruits are mostly not considered "carbohydrate" foods as their glycemic load is incredibly low.

See on www.ketogenic-diet-resource.com

LCHF for Beginners

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Do you want to eat real food (as much as you like) and improve your health and weight? It may sound too good to be true, but LCHF (Low Carb, High Fat) is a method that has been used for 150 years. Now, modern science backs it up with proof that it works. There is no weighing your food, no counting, no bizarre “meal replacements,” no pills. There is just real food and common sense. And all the advice here is 100 percent free. Contents Introduction Dietary advice  (in 26 languages) Theory Tips and recipes Cookbooks and more Frequently asked questions Introduction A LCHF diet means you eat less carbohydrates and a higher proportion of fat. Most importantly you minimize your intake of sugar and starches. You can eat other delicious foods until you are satisfied – and still lose weight. A number of recent high-quality scientific studies shows that LCHF makes it easier both to lose weight and to control your blood sugar. And that’s just the beginning. The […]

Asher Laub‘s insight:

If glucose doesn’t provide sustainable forms of energy for you (insulin drops too quickly) it’s worth trying a ketotic state of metabolism using this pretty accessible website. Videos make the "controversial" arguments in complete layman’s terms. 

See on www.dietdoctor.com

Ketones and Carbohydrates: Can they co-exist? – The Eating Academy | Peter Attia, M.D.

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For reasons I’m still struggling to understand, the idea of “nutritional ketosis” (NK, to be distinguished from starvation ketosis, SK or diabetic ketoacidosis, DKA) is often discussed and debated in much the same way as religion or politics. Perhaps this can be said of all nutrition, which is a shame.  Nevertheless, in my continued defiance of such sensitive topics, I’d like to add another layer of complexity and nuance to this discussion.
As I’ve written about before, I’ve spent much …

Asher Laub‘s insight:

Optimal energy can be achieved by paying close attention to macronutrient ratios (given quality food choices) calculated based on total caloric intake. The chart provides amazing clarity at a glance. The lower your caloric intake the closer your fats:calories:proteins can be and therefore, the more flexibility you have in your food choices. As daily caloric intake increase (need more energy etc.. or aren’t taking supplements) fats must be a higher ratio to that of proteins and carbohydrates in order that the body doesn’t get "confused" between NK (that ketogentic metabolic state-ie. burning fat and gluconeogensis, i.e. burning glucose for energy).

See on eatingacademy.com

Nutrition Journal | Full text | A review of fatty acid profiles and antioxidant content in grass-fed and grain-fed beef

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Growing consumer interest in grass-fed beef products has raised a number of questions with regard to the perceived differences in nutritional quality between grass-fed and grain-fed cattle. Research spanning three decades suggests that grass-based diets can significantly improve the fatty acid (FA) composition and antioxidant content of beef, albeit with variable impacts on overall palatability. Grass-based diets have been shown to enhance total conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) (C18:2) isomers, trans vaccenic acid (TVA) (C18:1 t11), a precursor to CLA, and omega-3 (n-3) FAs on a g/g fat basis. While the overall concentration of total SFAs is not different between feeding regimens, grass-finished beef tends toward a higher proportion of cholesterol neutral stearic FA (C18:0), and less cholesterol-elevating SFAs such as myristic (C14:0) and palmitic (C16:0) FAs. Several studies suggest that grass-based diets elevate precursors for Vitamin A and E, as well as cancer fighting antioxidants such as glutathione (GT) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity as compared to grain-fed contemporaries. Fat conscious consumers will also prefer the overall lower fat content of a grass-fed beef product. However, consumers should be aware that the differences in FA content will also give grass-fed beef a distinct grass flavor and unique cooking qualities that should be considered when making the transition from grain-fed beef. In addition, the fat from grass-finished beef may have a yellowish appearance from the elevated carotenoid content (precursor to Vitamin A). It is also noted that grain-fed beef consumers may achieve similar intakes of both n-3 and CLA through the consumption of higher fat grain-fed portions.

Asher Laub‘s insight:

This research provides evidence that butter is not necessarily responsible for raising cholesterol or blood pressure. If the butters grass fed it is cholesterol neutral. Another study shows that levels we’re raised in 1/3 of subjects…it was dependent upon life style and other dietary components such as grains and a genetic defect.

See on www.nutritionj.com

Why We Get Fat: And What to Do About It: Gary Taubes: 9780307474254: Amazon.com: Books

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Why We Get Fat: And What to Do About It [Gary Taubes] on Amazon.com. *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. Building upon his critical work in Good Calories, Bad Calories and presenting fresh evidence for his claim

Asher Laub‘s insight:

Harvard/Columbia-educated Gary Taub sums it all up with finess. Metabolic syndromes, heart disease, stroke, anemia, diabetes etc… that plague our country can be easily solved with the right diet.  And btw, the french aren ‘t healthy "in spite of their diet", but rather b/c of it. 

See on www.amazon.com

Dietary intake of saturated fatty acids and m… [Am J Clin Nutr. 2010] – PubMed – NCBI

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PubMed comprises more than 23 million citations for biomedical literature from MEDLINE, life science journals, and online books. Citations may include links to full-text content from PubMed Central and publisher web sites.

Asher Laub‘s insight:

58,000 participants in a Japanese study concluded that there is an inverse relationship between saturated fat intake and risk of cardiovascular disease/death etc… 

See on www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov

In a 2004 edito…

In a 2004 editorial in the Journal of American College of Cardiology, Sylvan Lee Weinberg, former president of the American College of Cardiology and outspoken proponent of the diet-heart hypothesis, said (11):

The low-fat, high-carbohydrate diet… may well have played an unintended role in the current epidemics of obesity, lipid abnormalities, type 2 diabetes, and metabolic syndromes. This diet can no longer be defended by appeal to the authority of prestigious medical organizations.

link posted by Chris Kresser

Rethinking Fat: The Case For Adding Some Into Your Diet

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There’s new thinking about the effects of fat on our waistlines and our hearts. And consensus is building that saturated fat isn’t the demon we were once told to fear, especially compared with carbs.

Asher Laub‘s insight:

Yes, medical journals can misdirect research. This article seems to provide some evidence to support this unfortunate reality. Low fat diets are a recent pharma invention. Countless population studies confirm this.

See on www.npr.org