Monthly Archives: April 2013

What Is So Menacing About Fiber?

See on Scoop.it21st Century Integrative Medicine

The widespread malnutrition trend in the United States isn’t caused by lack of food, but by people’s inability to assimilate those plentiful foods because dietary fiber disrupts digestion.

Asher Laub‘s insight:

A moderate amount of fiber in diet trumps a high consumption of fiber. Just look at what Harvard and the FDA say!

See on www.gutsense.org

Advertisements

The Cholesterol Myth

See on Scoop.it21st Century Integrative Medicine

Learn the Truth about cholesterol and the real indicator of heart disease!

Asher Laub‘s insight:

The cholesterol myth in a nutshell

See on www.youtube.com

LDL Cholesterol vs. LDL Particle Number, LDL-P and ApoB Measurements

See on Scoop.it21st Century Integrative Medicine

Dr. Thomas Dayspring explains the relative utility of the traditional LDL cholestrol measurement versus measures of LDL particle number, LDL-p and apoB. Heal…

Asher Laub‘s insight:

Effective cholesterol treatment should NOT stop with LDL-cholesterol. You need an LDL-P measurement to determine if high LDL-c is of concern. Triglycerides do NOT predict risk in patients, despite what most Docs say. Need LDL-p test for appropriate diagnostics.

See on www.youtube.com

Alpha-Lipoic Acid – In-Depth Scientific Supplement Information

See on Scoop.it21st Century Integrative Medicine

ALA is a fatty acid that exists in the mitochondria and is involved in energy metabolism. Commonly taken with [L-Carnitine] supplements as they are related in mechanisms.

Asher Laub‘s insight:

Benefits of alpha-lipoic acid based on 131 studies.

See on examine.com

Preliminary Study Questions Carnitine’s Role in Cardiovascular Disease, Generates Misleading Media Headlines

See on Scoop.it21st Century Integrative Medicine

A recent investigational study published by Koeth et al. in the journal Nature Medicine1 examined levels of a compound called trimethylamine-N-oxide (TMAO) in relationship to microbial metabolism of carnitine in the gut. The researchers cite very recent, limited research suggesting TMAO may be a risk factor for cardiovascular disease. They then provocatively propose that carnitine consumption may increase cardiovascular risk in some individuals due to increasing TMAO levels following microbial metabolism of the compound. 

The authors report the intestinal bacterial flora of people who consume red meat, a source of dietary carnitine, was conducive to TMAO production in the presence of carnitine, whereas vegetarians produced little to no TMAO under the same circumstances. They concluded that alterations in the intestinal microbiota associated with meat consumption may promote the formation of TMAO from dietary carnitine, and therefore suggested that the carnitine content of red meat may be one of the reasons it is linked to heart disease.

Following publication of this study, mainstream media outlets propagated misleading headlines blaming carnitine for heart disease without explaining that these findings were very preliminary and that red meat consumption was required for the observed effect. Life Extension® members are well aware of the potential health threats associated with red meat consumption, such as exposure to saturated fats and advanced glycation end products,4 and many already consume a heart-healthy, plant-based diet such as the Mediterranean diet.

These deceptive media headlines have generated concern that supplemental forms of L-carnitine may be detrimental to heart health. This notion flies in the face of numerous published, peer-reviewed studies showing L-carnitine promotescardiovascular health in a variety of ways. The media’s effort to generate headlines has undermined decades of scientific research on the heart-health benefits of carnitine.

 

New Mayo Clinic Meta-Analysis: Carnitine Improves Outcomes in Heart Attack Patients

Ironically, days after publication of the Koethe et al. carnitine article, a new meta-analysis of the research on carnitine and heart health was published by researchers from Mayo Clinic. This large systematic review provides strong evidence for carnitine’s benefits in heart health. This article examined 13 controlled trials that enrolled, collectively, 3629 participants, representing the largest, most powerful scientific review of carnitine’s cardiovascular benefits to date.2

The authors of the Mayo Clinic study found carnitine supplementation was associated with a 27% reduction in all-cause mortality, a 65% reduction in ventricular arrhythmias, and a 40% reduction in angina symptoms in patients who had experienced a heart attack. These effects were thought to occur through multiple mechanisms, including improved energy metabolism in the mitochondria, decreased ischemia, and enhanced left ventricle function.2

The authors describe carnitine as an inexpensive therapy with an “excellent safety profile” which could potentially be used in patients with angina or who are at risk for angina after suffering from a heart attack. Based on the results of this meta-analysis, the authors suggest L-carnitine as a potential future therapy for heart attack and secondary coronary prevention and treatment, including angina. The scientists state: “Further study with large randomized controlled trials of this inexpensive and safe therapy in the modern era is warranted.” Unfortunately they also note:”However, a large trial may never be performed because L-carnitine is an over-the-counter supplement available to the public, which decreases the potential revenue compared with a synthesized [pharmaceutical] product.”2

Carnitine’s benefits are well-established and Life Extension® has written about them at length over the years.  The next several paragraphs describe some of the key health benefits associated with carnitine.

Asher Laub‘s insight:

Misleading is right and it’s important to realize that red-meat is often a risk factor for those who consume it too much, which does NOT apply to everyone.  

See on www.lef.org

Is Organic Better? Ask a Fruit Fly

See on Scoop.it21st Century Integrative Medicine

A middle-school experiment using fruit flies and organic foods has won publication in a national scientific journal and spurred a debate about the relative benefits of organic eating.

Asher Laub‘s insight:

Fruitflies who fed off of organic produce fared better than those who consumed conventionally grown produce. Organic food is more expensive than conventionally grown produce, however, it saves you money and stress in the long run when it comes to medical bills and general well-being.

See on well.blogs.nytimes.com

Rhodiola: a promising anti-aging Chinese herb. [Rejuvenation Res. 2007] – PubMed – NCBI

See on Scoop.it21st Century Integrative Medicine

PubMed comprises more than 22 million citations for biomedical literature from MEDLINE, life science journals, and online books. Citations may include links to full-text content from PubMed Central and publisher web sites.

Asher Laub‘s insight:

NIH study confirms the likelihood of Rhodiola’s effect on longevity and general health.  Multiple metabolic pathways are impacted by herb.  Reported side-effect are virtual nill.

See on www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov

Natural childbirth VI: Pitocin side effects and risks

See on Scoop.it21st Century Integrative Medicine

Almost 1/4 of women in the U.S. receive Pitocin during labor. But what does the research suggest about the safety of induction with oxytocin?

Asher Laub‘s insight:

Pitocin (synthetic oxytocin) is necessary, in many cases, for induction, but it is overused and irresponsibly so, being that there are countless risks to both mother and fetus.

See on chriskresser.com

Homocysteine

See on Scoop.it21st Century Integrative Medicine

Asher Laub‘s insight:

Medical scandal of the century was shutting down McCully’s work. Why isn’t homocysteine used for every

See on pajarostreet.com

TLC Cooking “Whiten Teeth With Strawberries”

See on Scoop.it21st Century Integrative Medicine

An alabaster smile is only a strawberry and some baking soda away. Learn more about whiten teeth with strawberries.

Asher Laub‘s insight:

Thanks susan for the post!

See on recipes.howstuffworks.com